yulinisworking:

I Ship It | a short film by Yulin Kuang

After a bad breakup, Zoe Smallman decides to take down her ex-boyfriend in a wizard rock battle of the bands with help from her best friend, Charlie.

Written & Directed by Yulin Kuang

Starring
Mary Kate Wiles as Zoe
Sean Persaud as Charlie
Joey Richter as Peter
Jenna C. Johnson as Macy
Irene Choi as Sofia

Featuring original Wizard Rock songs by Kirstyn Hippe

hardziam:

why are teenage girls so belittled? have you met a teenage girl??? they study harder than any boy i’ve ever met. they’re nicer than any boy or man i’ve ever met and their goals and dreams are no less valid so why are they treated like their brains are mushy lumps of goo that only think about boys 24/7???

(via marykatewiles)

Tags: feminism

ink-phoenix:

bonesbuckleup:

topunk4you:

bonesbuckleup:

topunk4you:

wiselizard:

Alexander Pierce + healthy villainous emotions

 #I KNOW IF TUMBLR COULD IT WOULD GIVE ME NEGATIVE NOTES FOR THIS POST BECAUSE EVERYONE HATES THIS GUY SO MUCH #BUT IDK HE’S MARVELLOUS DEFINITELY THE BEST MARVEL VILLAIN YET #REALLY SHITSCARY #NO PATHOS OR BROKEN PSYCHE LIKE RONAN OR MALEKITH #NO DADDY ISSUES OR JEALOUSY OR A FACE THAT COMES OFF??? #A COLD MIND COMPLETELY IN THE GAME #LIKE IN THE THIRD GIF #THAT’S HOW YOU REACT TO AN UNEXPECTED MOVE ON THE CHESSBOARD #BUT IT’S OKAY #HE’S A MANAGER HE’S GONNA MANAGE IT HE’S GOT HIS MBA #HE KNOWS HOW THIS WORLD WORKS BECAUSE HE SHAPED IT AND YOU CAN’T OUTPLAY HIM #UNLESS YOU GIVE HIM LEAD POISONING #FROM YOUR GUN TO HIS CHEST #THAT WASN’T IT HIS MBA PROGRAM #HAHAH

And here I thought we could go without romanticizing one more white male villain smh

I would argue there is a difference between acknowledging that a character is a fantastic, multifaceted villain and romanticizing them.

Pierce is cold. He is calculating. He knows how to manipulate people into doing what he wants. He’s not afraid to use pawns and sacrifice them accordingly. God, he is an awful person. A terrible one. He’s an abuser and unapologetic and willing to take out millions of people for his vision, however fucked up that vision is, of the greater good.

Recognizing that he is one of the most terrifying villains that marvel has rolled out with does not equal romanticizing him. He’s the kind of evil that creeps up without you noticing and by the time you do it’s too late. He’s smiling as he stabs you in the back. Pierce is important because he’s the bad guy who can actually exist in the world today. There aren’t people building giant robots, there aren’t Norse gods or nazis peeling their faces off. What there are in this world are politicians in positions of power who abuse that power and nothing is more dangerous than that.

Those tags are great because if you go against Pierce in a battle of wits you WILL NOT WIN. Plain and simple. Literally the only way to stop him was pure force.

TLDR - pierce is a despicable human being but recognizing why and how he is an excellent villain for this day and age does not equal romanticizing him.

I actually just used the wrong word, I meant glorifying not romanticizing

I’d still argue though that he’s not being glorified? Everything within the post is canon.

I think everything you need to know about Pierce is in the line “the man turned down a Nobel Peace Prize.” He had literally everyone so fooled that not even NICK FURY suspected him until far too late. I’m not trying to put Pierce on a pedestal or anything like that, but he was winning at a game that no one else even knew they were playing.

Like I hate Pierce. I HATE him. Like I said, he is an abuser and a terrorist and a terrible person. But Talking about his effectiveness as a villain in context of a movie still doesn’t equal glorifying him.

For a villain to be effective, they must be the hero of their own story. 

THAT’s what makes a good villain. THAT’s what makes a villain terrifying. THAT’s what makes Pierce terrifying. Because Pierce is the best villain Marvel has given us because he is real. He’s in congress; he’s leading our troops; he’s in the Senate; he’s sitting in the UN; he’s at the head of a multi-billion dollar corporation and he’s drafting laws and hey, did we forget that we already have a project insight? Because what’s the difference between the helicarriers and drones?

What makes CA: TWS such an amazing piece of storytelling is that it is absolutely a sociopolitical thriller disguised as a superhero movie. And if Pierce wasn’t the cold, smart, dispassionate, well-spoken, insidious bastard that he is, he wouldn’t be nowhere as effective. Even after Steve gives his passionate speech at the Triskelion, even when the World Security Council turns against him, Pierce still thinks he can win by spinning things his way. He absolutely believes he’s doing this for the greater good. No villain worth his screen time ever looks at the things they do and thinks ‘ah yes I am such a terrible person, doing these evil, awful and morally wrong things.’ Every single villain must absolutely think they are absolutely in the right, and the hero is their villain. Or they become stereotypes and caricatures. 

Discussing the type of villain Pierce is has nothing to do with glorifying him or romanticizing him. It has everything to do with recognizing the Russos’ clever, brilliant writing, which shows us that real, true evil doesn’t need to have a red skull or an army of chitauri. Real evil exists, we are steeped in it, and we don’t even fucking know it until it’s too late.

(via threefeettotheleft)

(Source: xoxstarlight, via purplueprose)

mypatronusisyou:

hellohappylisa:

stop-on-astaire:

I’ve been waiting for this gifset my whole life.

So I’m assuming at least 95% of tumblr is hearing this whole scene perfectly in their head, right?

the idea of people not hearing this in their head is inconceivable

(Source: tickatocka, via shakeytime)

"

When Van Gogh was a young man in his early twenties, he was in London studying to be a clergyman. He had no thought of being an artist at all. he sat in his cheap little room writing a letter to his younger brother in Holland, whom he loved very much. He looked out his window at a watery twilight, a thin lamppost, a star, and he said in his letter something like this: “it is so beautiful I must show you how it looks.” And then on his cheap ruled note paper, he made the most beautiful, tender, little drawing of it.

When I read this letter of Van Gogh’s it comforted me very much and seemed to throw a clear light on the whole road of Art. Before, I thought that to produce a work of painting or literature, you scowled and thought long and ponderously and weighed everything solemnly and learned everything that all artists had ever done aforetime, and what their influences and schools were, and you were extremely careful about *design* and *balance* and getting *interesting planes* into your painting, and avoided, with the most astringent severity, showing the faintest *academical* tendency, and were strictly modern. And so on and so on.

But the moment I read Van Gogh’s letter I knew what art was, and the creative impulse. It is a feeling of love and enthusiasm for something, and in a direct, simple, passionate and true way, you try to show this beauty in things to others, by drawing it.

And Van Gogh’s little drawing on the cheap note paper was a work of art because he loved the sky and the frail lamppost against it so seriously that he made the drawing with the most exquisite conscientiousness and care.

"

— Brenda UelandIf You Want to Write: A Book about Art, Independence and Spirit (via raggedybearcat)

(Source: nyctaeus, via shakeytime)

poc-creators:

mumblingsage:

xekstrinavidad:

fictionwritingtips:

thebluebird:

A professional script reader read 300 screenplays for five different studios, all the while tracking the many recurring problems. The infographic he made with the collected data offers a glimpse at where screenwriting goes wrong.

(via kyrieanne)

flourishandblottsstories:

There are two well-worn tales of the first witch.  The more religious families tell their children of Lillith, that most misunderstood Biblical character, the mother of all purebloods.  The secular families speak of the mitochondrial Eve, a woman who long ago, was born with magical ability for reasons unknown.  The very existence of Muggleborns disproves both of these stories, of course, but since when has anyone needed proof to believe?


 

The truth is both simpler and more complex.

 

Your body is made of electricity.  The thoughts you think, the moves you make, the sights you see all come from the electrical impulses that course through your body faster than comprehension.  The language of the human experience is electric.

 

Many, many years ago, before written language or the spoken word, a mutation occurred in a baby girl.  This girl passed that mutation on to her children, and then to their children and their children, multiplying and spreading throughout the population.  


 

This mutation caused a series of repeats on chromosome 13.  Some children were born with only one repeat, some with hundreds or thousands.  In those with repeats stretching into triple digits, the electrical signals between neurons were strengthened.  Neurons, while well insulated in their myelin sheaths, cannot always contain the potential that runs through them.  And as the signals grew stronger, as the repeats increased, that electrical excess had to go somewhere.



We call it magic.

 


All things, animate and inanimate, have a magnetic field, a gravitational pull.  That which we call magic results in the ability to manipulate these fields, to change matter in ways that defy Muggle physical law.  

 


This, of course, was not known until well into the twenty third century.  By then, the International Statute of Secrecy had long been repealed, and institutes of science and magic coexisted and collaborated around the world.  Scholars looked back on centuries past and laughed at the ignorance of the old Wizarding World.  Of course they couldn’t use Muggle devices!  When one walks about pulsing with electricity, anything with a plug is bound to go haywire.  How could they not see it?  

 

How could they not guess that the secrets to their world lay not in tales or lineage, but deep at the core of what makes us human?

 

Partial credit for this must go to thepostmodernpottercompendium; this idea came from our excited discussion about the nature of magic

 

The stunning art seen here is by artist Greg Dunn, whose work hangs in our graduate department and who is an incredibly talented artist.  Find more of his work at www.gregdunn.com

flourishandblottsstories:

There are two well-worn tales of the first witch.  The more religious families tell their children of Lillith, that most misunderstood Biblical character, the mother of all purebloods.  The secular families speak of the mitochondrial Eve, a woman who long ago, was born with magical ability for reasons unknown.  The very existence of Muggleborns disproves both of these stories, of course, but since when has anyone needed proof to believe?

 

The truth is both simpler and more complex.

 

Your body is made of electricity.  The thoughts you think, the moves you make, the sights you see all come from the electrical impulses that course through your body faster than comprehension.  The language of the human experience is electric.

 

Many, many years ago, before written language or the spoken word, a mutation occurred in a baby girl.  This girl passed that mutation on to her children, and then to their children and their children, multiplying and spreading throughout the population. 

 

This mutation caused a series of repeats on chromosome 13.  Some children were born with only one repeat, some with hundreds or thousands.  In those with repeats stretching into triple digits, the electrical signals between neurons were strengthened.  Neurons, while well insulated in their myelin sheaths, cannot always contain the potential that runs through them.  And as the signals grew stronger, as the repeats increased, that electrical excess had to go somewhere.

We call it magic.

 

All things, animate and inanimate, have a magnetic field, a gravitational pull.  That which we call magic results in the ability to manipulate these fields, to change matter in ways that defy Muggle physical law. 

 

This, of course, was not known until well into the twenty third century.  By then, the International Statute of Secrecy had long been repealed, and institutes of science and magic coexisted and collaborated around the world.  Scholars looked back on centuries past and laughed at the ignorance of the old Wizarding World.  Of course they couldn’t use Muggle devices!  When one walks about pulsing with electricity, anything with a plug is bound to go haywire.  How could they not see it? 

 

How could they not guess that the secrets to their world lay not in tales or lineage, but deep at the core of what makes us human?

 

Partial credit for this must go to thepostmodernpottercompendium; this idea came from our excited discussion about the nature of magic

 

The stunning art seen here is by artist Greg Dunn, whose work hangs in our graduate department and who is an incredibly talented artist.  Find more of his work at www.gregdunn.com

mariiitza:

you and me both.

mariiitza:

you and me both.

(via baseball-heaven)