"I often approach my book using a series of ‘Narrative Dares’ and one of my narrative dares for ‘First Among Sequels’ was to have a teenage son who saves the world by doing nothing. Tricky, I know, but I like the idea, and knowing teenager’s fulsome embrace of inactivity, I thought they’s like it too. If they could be bothered to read. In any event, I needed a teenager, and Thursday didn’t have one yet, so I made everyone thirteen years older. It was as simple as that. I can always go back and add stories into the gap. Writing is an odd thing to do; often the largest leaps in a book’s narrative can have surprisingly mundane causes."

— Jasper Fforde (on Reddit)

(Source: reddit.com, via ffordefans)

washingtonnationals:

Talk about saving the day!

washingtonnationals:

Talk about saving the day!

washingtonnationals:

Wow. Just wow. Steven Souza saves Jordan Zimmermann’s no hitter. What a day at Nationals Park.

thepostmodernpottercompendium:

It was not, as some people supposed, that she did not know that the Nargles were not real. But it became easier, if you believed in Nargles, to believe in all kinds of other things and so, to remain serene and unruffled even in the most trying of circumstances.
If you can’t believe in six impossible things about the world, her mother would say, how will you ever believe all the impossible things that people will do?
And if you could believe in one impossibility, it became easier to believe in so many implausibilities. Little things that all added up to big things and people, with their odd inner live became less incomprehensible and all the more understandable. 
And in time, Luna found that of all her friends, it was she who believed that people, with all their follies and all their dark little cupboards full of secrets they would much rather no one knew, were not as averse to change (for the better) as they imagined. They could change; one only needed to give them a gentle push in the right direction. Luna, out of all of them, remained the gentle reminder that there is always hope, even when evil seems to overshadow everything, if only one knew how to believe in impossibilities.
If you could believe in Nargles, you could believe in people.

thepostmodernpottercompendium:

It was not, as some people supposed, that she did not know that the Nargles were not real. But it became easier, if you believed in Nargles, to believe in all kinds of other things and so, to remain serene and unruffled even in the most trying of circumstances.

If you can’t believe in six impossible things about the world, her mother would say, how will you ever believe all the impossible things that people will do?

And if you could believe in one impossibility, it became easier to believe in so many implausibilities. Little things that all added up to big things and people, with their odd inner live became less incomprehensible and all the more understandable.

And in time, Luna found that of all her friends, it was she who believed that people, with all their follies and all their dark little cupboards full of secrets they would much rather no one knew, were not as averse to change (for the better) as they imagined. They could change; one only needed to give them a gentle push in the right direction. Luna, out of all of them, remained the gentle reminder that there is always hope, even when evil seems to overshadow everything, if only one knew how to believe in impossibilities.

If you could believe in Nargles, you could believe in people.

dendritic-trees:

derevko:

last-snowfall:

Steve name me one time between Basic and going into the ice that you actually followed orders. ONE. TIME.

image

I have feelings about this.  I’m supposed to be doing work, but its hard, so I’m gonna explain them instead.  Right from the start of CA:TFA we see that Steve really specifically wants to be a soldier.  He knows there’s all sorts of various ways to support the war effort, but not, specifically he wants to fight on the front lines.  

But Steve is never a particularly good soldier, in fact, he very specifically isn’t a good soldier.  Steve is a good man not a perfect soldier.  Steve NEVER has any success when he tries his hand at being a regular soldier, or even a supersoldier.  In CA:TFA he ends up working with the Howling Commandos, almost entirely outside of the regular military structure and that’s when he manages all the serious heroics and really lives up to his potential.  In Avengers at the beginning he tries to be a good soldier for a while and tries to follow Fury’s orders, but for the first half of the movie Steve is lost and miserable and visibly hiding behind his USO Tour “Captain America” persona.  But its only when he goes off on his own, breaks into store rooms and steals Fury’s proto-type tesseract weapons, that he really gets anything done (before that he gets batted about by Loki and sort of wanders about at loose ends), and he doesn’t really get back into a leadership role and really become actual Captain America again, until he steals a quinn jet with Natasha and Clint.

And despite that, in CA:WS he’s back at Shield, trying to be ‘the greatest soldier in history’ and ‘follow orders’, and… not doing that at all…

So where does Steve’s abortive fascination with being a good soldier come from?

Partly I think its an expression of his very obvious depression.  I’ve seen about umpteen criticisms of Steve’s ‘we have our orders’ line to Tony in Avengers but I think that the fact its out of character is the point.  Steve is miserable, and lost, he doesn’t know what makes him happy, he doesn’t know what he wants to do with himself so he follows Nick Fury’s orders, because he has given up.  

But also I think that even though Steve doesn’t really want to be the sort of person who follows orders, he to a certain extent wants to want it, sort of as the equivalent of a very bright girl who plays dumb in class because she’s been told no one likes smart girls.  The good soldier is very much the model of ideal masculine success that Steve would have grown up with but wouldn’t have ever been able to achieve   

Which is ironic given that the ideal male icon most of the cast of the Avengers probably grew up with… is Captain America.

(Source: forassgard, via captainofalltheships)

washingtonnationals:

What a way to get home-field advantage!

washingtonnationals:

What a way to get home-field advantage!


(x)

(x)

(Source: harrypottzr, via shakeytime)

thosenerdyfeels:

beeishappy:

Stephen Colbert on Late Night with Seth Meyers

image

TCR | 2007.03.12 | It reads: “Dear Stephen, As editor-in-chief of Marvel, I am burdened with the handling of our character’s estates and the sad event that a hero should perish before his time. Captain America’s will was read last Friday, and while heavy hearted, I am proud to announce the star spangled Avenger has bequeathed his most valuable possession, his indestructible shield, to the only man he believed had the red, white, and blue balls to carry the mantle. Stephen Colbert. Welcome to the Marvel Universe. Sincerely, Joe Quesada.

How can you but just love this?

(via themarysue)


#ginny weasley is a great fucking character and if you can’t see that you probably only watched the movies 

emmawatsonsdaily:

One of the reasons why Emma Watson is one of the best female role-models of our time. She’s so underrated.

(via marykatewiles)